The power of groups

Introduction From the moment we are born, we are members of a group.  The group could be as small as one caregiver and an infant but is likely larger.  We learn about dependency in our first groups.  We hopefully learn to trust powerful others to take care of us and to teach us how to […]

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Practical ways to calm our nervous system

by Katharina Zwielich, MSc When we struggle with stress, anxiety, and uncomfortable emotional arousal, the part of our nervous system called the sympathetic nervous system is in overdrive. The autonomic nervous system is the part of our nervous system that we don’t control consciously – think breathing, digesting, and heartbeat. There are two subsystems that, […]

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Addiction to fantasy and daydreams

An introduction and some thoughts by Debbie Quackenbush, Ph.D. Alcohol, sex, shopping, food:  all require input from the outside. To maintain problematic usage, the human must acquire something.  Not the case, when it comes to addiction to one’s internal fantasy-world.  One’s fantasies are tucked away in their mind, to be accessed anytime, anywhere.  Here is […]

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Three reasons why therapy might be beneficial to anyone

by Jeanette Galan Mogensen, intern, The Little White House Psychotherapy is a relatively new practice that has only really been around as a scientific discipline for the last century. That’s not a long time, when you consider how long the practice of medicine has been around (some 40 centuries). A common way of perceiving psychotherapy […]

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Vaccine Envy – When Is It My Turn?

By our intern Thea Haldorsen The Framework Agreement Plan for Reopening of Denmark was introduced to the public on April 15th [1]. For the first time since the pandemic broke out we can see light at the end of the tunnel. In just a few months we will be able to hug, have big dinner […]

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Understimulation and humanity

by Debbie Quackenbush, Ph.D. Several years ago, I started noticing that zoo animals had seemingly random objects in their enclosures.  I recall asking a zoo employee about them and was informed that even animals get bored and have ill effects from under stimulation.  Putting toys and novel objects in their cages was a way to […]

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Jungian Psychotherapy– a few words

What is Jungian Psychotherapy? by Veronika Leonova, M.A. Jungian psychotherapy is based on the works of a Swiss psychiatrist, C. G. Jung. It is a form of depth psychotherapy that is distinguished by a focus on the symbolic experiences in one’s life. The issues and problems a client comes with are examined both in terms […]

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I’m in isolation. Now what?

A former Little White House intern writes about his experience in isolation due to COVID exposure by Eivind Hamarheim Johnsen By the first 2-3 weeks of March this year, the sars-CoV-2 virus (coronavirus) developed into a pandemic and caused the majority of countries worldwide to a lockdown. The societal effects of the lockdown were enormous […]

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Procrastination

by Heidrun Hoppe When I was a young Psychology student there was one new word I got to learn before many others. Procrastination. I remember sitting in one of those first lectures, along with a bunch of newly enrolled young students, eyes sparkling with motivation, while my statistics professor introduced us to a phenomenon we […]

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Eat, pray, love

Eat, pray, love by Alex Shrimpton You are what you eat and what you eat matters! We hear that all the time but what effect our eating choices have on our mental health can be somewhat misleading as it is difficult to consider a universally healthy diet taking into account cultural factors, historical trends and […]

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